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Eucharistic Prayer I
19731998Latin20082011
We come to you, Father,
with praise and thanksgiving,
through Jesus Christ your Son.
Through him we ask you
to accept and bless these gifts
we offer you in sacrifice.

We offer them
for your holy catholic Church,
watch over it, Lord, and guide it;
grant it peace and unity
throughout the world.
We offer them for N. our Pope,
for N. our bishop,
and for all who hold and teach
the catholic faith
that comes to us from the apostles.
All-merciful Father, we come before you
with praise and thanksgiving
through Jesus Christ your Son.
Through him we ask you
to accept and bless these gifts
we offer you in sacrifice.

We offer them
for your holy catholic Church:
watch over it, Lord, and guide it,
grant it peace and unity
throughout the world.
We offer them for N. our Pope,
for N. our Bishop,
and for all who hold and teach
the catholic faith
that comes to us from the apostles.
Te igitur, clementissime Pater,
per Iesum Christum,
Filium tuum, Dominum nostrum,
supplices rogamus ac petimus,
uti accepta habeas et benedicas
haec dona, haec munera,
haec sancta sacrificia illibata
,
in primis, quae tibi offerimus
pro Ecclesia tua sancta catholica:
quam pacificare,
custodire, adunare et regere digneris
toto orbe terrarum:
una cum famulo tuo Papa nostro N.
et Antistite nostro N.
et omnibus orthodoxis
atque catholicae
et apostolicae fidei cultoribus.
To you, therefore, most merciful Father,
we make humble prayer and petition
through Jesus Christ,
your Son, our Lord:
that you accept and bless
these gifts, these offerings,
these holy and unblemished sacrifices,
which we offer you first of all
for your holy catholic Church.
Be pleased to grant her peace,
to guard, unite and govern her
throughout the whole world,
together with your servant N. our Pope
and N. our Bishop,
and all those who, holding to the truth,
hand on the catholic
and apostolic faith.
To you, therefore, most merciful Father,
we make humble prayer and petition
through Jesus Christ,
your Son, our Lord:
that you accept and bless
these gifts, these offerings,
these holy and unblemished sacrifices,
which we offer you firstly
for your holy catholic Church.
Be pleased to grant her peace,
to guard, unite and govern her
throughout the whole world,
together with your servant N. our Pope
and N. our Bishop,
and all those who, holding to the truth,
hand on the catholic
and apostolic faith.
1973 and 1998 do not express the connection implied by igitur (therefore), the humility of supplices rogamus ac petimus (this is seen throughout the two older translations, so it will be mentioned only once), or the typically Roman style of haec dona, haec munera, haec sancta sacrificia illibata.
2011 loses the pleasing sound of "the catholic faith that comes to us from the apostles" in favor of the closer translation of orthodoxis atque catholicae as "catholic and apostolic".
Remember, Lord, your people,
especially those for whom we now pray, NN.
Remember all of us gathered here before you.
You know how firmly we believe in you
and dedicate ourselves to you.

We offer you
this sacrifice of praise
for ourselves and those who are dear to us.
We pray to you,
our living and true God,
for our well-being
and redemption.
Remember, Lord, your faithful people,
especially those for whom we now pray NN.
Remember all of us gathered here before you.
You know that we believe in you
and dedicate ourselves to you.

We offer you
this sacrifice of praise
for ourselves and those who are dear to us;
we pray to you,
our living and true God,
for our well-being
and redemption.
Memento, Domine,
famulorum famularumque tuarum N. et N.
et omnium circumstantium,
quorum tibi fides cognita est
et nota devotio,
pro quibus tibi offerimus:
vel
qui tibi offerunt
hoc sacrificium laudis,
pro se suisque omnibus:
pro redemptione animarum suarum,
pro spe salutis et incolumitatis suae:
tibique reddunt vota sua
aeterno Deo, vivo et vero.
Remember, Lord,
your servants N. and N.
and all gathered here,
whose faith
and devotion are known to you.
For them and all who are dear to them
we offer you this sacrifice of praise
or they offer it for themselves
and all who are dear to them,
for the redemption of their souls,
in hope of health and well-being,
and fulfilling their vows to you,
the eternal God, living and true.
Remember, Lord,
your servants N. and N.
and all gathered here,
whose faith
and devotion are known to you.
For them,
we offer you this sacrifice of praise
or they offer it for themselves
and all who are dear to them:
for the redemption of their souls,
in hope of health and well-being,
and paying their homage to you,
the eternal God, living and true.
1973 and 1998 avoid translating famulorum famularumque as "servants" (male and female), in favor of the softer "(faithful) people", omitting part of the relationship denoted by the Latin expression. The couplet pro quibus tibi offerimus: vel qui tibi offerunt ("for whom we offer, or who [themselves] offer") has been simplified, owing to the great likelihood that the vel was actually a rubric (either "for whom we offer" or "who offer" was to be used by the priest) which became mistakenly incorporated as a word of the prayer; the pro quibus tibi offerimus vel was added in the ninth century by Alcuin, who assembled an edition of the Gregorian sacramentary for Charlemagne. 1973 and 1998 also omit animarum ("redemption of their souls"), combine salutis et incolumitatis into one ("well-being"), and simplify reddunt vota sua to "pray", instead of "paying [fulfilling] their vows".
2011 accepts the vel anomaly as part of the text of the prayer and renders it accordingly. It also translates reddunt vota sua as "paying their homage" (rather than "vows"); this phrase is an allusion to Ps. 116:14 and 18, and part of the idea behind the new translation is to better represent scriptural citations and allusions. [cf. Ps 49[50]:14, "immola Deo sacrificium laudis et redde Altissimo vota tua"]
In union
with the whole Church
we honor
Mary,
the ever-virgin
mother of Jesus Christ
our Lord and God.
We honor Joseph,
her husband,
the apostles
and martyrs
Peter and Paul, Andrew, [...]
and all the saints.

May their merits and prayers
gain us your constant help
and protection.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
We pray in communion
with the whole Church,
with those whose memory we now honor:
especially with Mary,
the glorious and ever-virgin
mother of Jesus Christ,
our Lord and God,
with Joseph,
her husband,
the apostles
and martyrs,
Peter and Paul, Andrew, [...]
and with all the saints.

By their merits and prayers
grant us your constant help
and protection.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Communicantes,

et memoriam venerantes,
in primis gloriosae semper Virginis
Mariae,
Genetricis Dei et Domini nostri
Iesu Christi:
sed et beati Ioseph,
eiusdem Virginis Sponsi,
et beatorum Apostolorum
ac Martyrum tuorum,
Petri et Pauli, Andreae, [...]
et omnium Sanctorum tuorum;

quorum meritis precibusque concedas,
ut in omnibus protectionis
tuae muniamur auxilio.
[ Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen. ]
In communion

with those whose memory we venerate,
especially the glorious ever-Virgin
Mary,
Mother of our God and Lord,
Jesus Christ,
and blessed Joseph,
Spouse of the same Virgin,
your blessed Apostles
and Martyrs,
Peter and Paul, Andrew, [...]
and all your Saints:

through their merits and prayers,
grant that
in all things we may be defended
by your protecting help.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
In communion

with those whose memory we venerate,
especially the glorious ever-Virgin
Mary,
Mother of our God and Lord,
Jesus Christ,
and blessed Joseph,
her Spouse,
your blessed Apostles
and Martyrs,
Peter and Paul, Andrew, [...]
and all your Saints;
we ask that
through their merits and prayers,
in all things we may be defended
by your protecting help.
(Through Christ our Lord. Amen.)
The Communicantes is a tough prayer to translate, because it is not a complete thought on its own: Communicantes et ... venerates are two participles, "Sharing with and venerating", rather than two conjugated verbs, "We share with and venerate", and there is no first-person verb in the first half of the prayer (except for an unlikely implied "we are"). All three English translations introduce a first-person verb: "We honor" (1973), "We pray" (1998), "We ask" (2011).
1973 omits most of the adjectives on the saints (gloriosae, beati/orum); 1998 restores the gloriosae but omits the others. Both translate the rather particular sponsi as "husband" rather than "spouse".
The choice of "spouse" over "husband" in the 2011 text is more faithful to the Latin; it is possibly related to the belief that the marital union between Mary and Joseph was a non-sexual one, but whether "husband" implies a sexual relationship moreso than "spouse" is not clear to me. At one time, the new English translation rendered literally eiusdem Virginis Sponsi: "spouse of the same Virgin", but this was dropped in favor of the simpler "her Spouse". Elsewhere in the Eucharistic Prayers, "the same" is retained, but in this case, it was deemed unnecessary.
Father,
accept this offering
from your whole family.
Grant us your peace in this life,
save us
from final damnation,
and count us
among those you have chosen.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Lord,
accept this offering
from your whole family.
Grant us your peace in this life,
save us
from final damnation,
and count us
among those you have chosen.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Hanc igitur oblationem servitutis nostrae,
sed et cunctae familiae tuae,
quaesumus, Domine, ut placatus accipias:
diesque nostros in tua pace disponas,
atque ab aeterna damnatione
nos eripi
et in electorum tuorum iubeas
grege numerari.
[ Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen. ]
Therefore, Lord, we pray:
graciously accept this oblation of our service,
that of your whole family;
order our days in your peace,
and command that we be delivered
from eternal damnation
and counted among the flock
of those you have chosen.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Therefore, Lord, we pray:
graciously accept this oblation of our service,
that of your whole family;
order our days in your peace,
and command that we be delivered
from eternal damnation
and counted among the flock
of those you have chosen.
(Through Christ our Lord. Amen.)
1973 and 1998 omit the strong New Testament image of the flock (grege).
2011 renders aeterna damnatione more accurately, not just as "final damnation" (as in 1973 and 1998) but as "eternal damnation". The use of the stronger words like "order" and "command" (disponsas ... iubeas) in place of a softer word like "grant" attest to God's supreme will.
Bless and approve our offering;
make it acceptable to you,
an offering in spirit and in truth.
Let it become for us
the body and blood
of Jesus Christ,
your only Son, our Lord.
Bless and approve our offering,
make it acceptable to you,
an offering in spirit and in truth:
let it become for us
the body and blood
of your beloved Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ.
Quam oblationem tu, Deus,
in omnibus, quaesumus, benedictam,
adscriptam, ratam, rationabilem,
acceptabilemque facere digneris:
ut nobis
Corpus et Sanguis fiat
dilectissimi Filii tui,
Domini nostri Iesu Christi.
Be pleased, O God, we pray,
to bless, acknowledge,
and approve this offering in every respect;
make it spiritual and acceptable,
so that it may become for us
the Body and Blood
of your most beloved Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ.
Be pleased, O God, we pray,
to bless, acknowledge,
and approve this offering in every respect;
make it spiritual and acceptable,
so that it may become for us
the Body and Blood
of your most beloved Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ.
1973 and 1998 opt to translate ratam, rationabilem as "in spirit and in truth", quoting John 4:24. A noble and (hopefully) well-known scriptural allusion, but not what the Canon was referring to. The word rationabilem originally meant "reasonable", but by the time it was incorporated into the Canon, it had come to mean "spiritual" (as opposed to material). The allusion, less clear than the one interpolated previously, is to Romans 12:1, which speaks of an "acceptable" sacrifice, "your spiritual worship". In the Greek, the word is logike, which has logos as its root, a connection to the Logos, the Word; this Greek word was translated by rationabile in the Vulgate, and that is the word found in the Canon.
2011 accurately renders dilectissimi as "most beloved", rather than "only" (1973) or simply "beloved" (1998).
The day before he suffered
he took bread
in his sacred hands
and looking up to heaven,
to you, his almighty Father,
he gave you thanks and praise.
He broke the bread,
gave it to his disciples, and said:
TAKE THIS...
The day before he suffered
he took bread
in his sacred hands,
and looking up to heaven
to you, his almighty Father,
he gave you thanks and praise;
he broke the bread,
gave it to his disciples, and said:
TAKE THIS...
Qui, pridie quam pateretur,
accepit panem
in sanctas ac venerabiles manus suas,
et elevatis oculis in caelum
ad te Deum Patrem suum omnipotentem,
tibi gratias agens benedixit,
fregit,
deditque discipulis suis, dicens:
ACCIPITE...
On the day before he was to suffer
he took bread
in his holy and venerable hands,
and with eyes raised to heaven
to you, O God, his almighty Father,
giving you thanks he said the blessing,
broke the bread
and gave it to his disciples, saying:
TAKE THIS...
On the day before he was to suffer,
he took bread
in his holy and venerable hands,
and with eyes raised to heaven
to you, O God, his almighty Father,
giving you thanks, he said the blessing,
broke the bread
and gave it to his disciples, saying:
TAKE THIS...
1973 and 1998 combine sanctas ac venerabiles as one ("holy"), and omits the explicit reference to the eyes in elevatis oculis in caelum, losing the juxtaposition of "hands" and "eyes". They also both render gratias agens benedixit as "thanks and praise", losing the idea of blessing.
2011 restores the "venerable" and the "eyes". Although Jesus "looked up to heaven" on several occasions in the Gospels (according to both the Latin and English texts), in John 17:1 it is written that he "lifted up his eyes to heaven" (sublevatis oculis in caelum). The Canon chose the more explicit language over the less explicit, and so the new translation does the same. The phrase tibi gratias agens, benedixit is accurately rendered as "giving you thanks, he said the blessing". This restores the idea that Jesus said a prayer of blessing over the bread (and wine) which thanked God for His creation and bountiful giving, rather than some other prayer in praise of God.
When supper was ended,
he took the cup.

Again he gave you thanks
and praise,
gave the cup to his disciples, and said:
TAKE THIS...
When supper was ended,
he took the cup;

again he gave you thanks
and praise,
gave the cup to his disciples, and said:
TAKE THIS...
Simili modo, postquam cenatum est,
accipiens et hunc praeclarum calicem
in sanctas ac venerabiles manus suas,
item tibi gratias agens
benedixit,
deditque discipulis suis, dicens:
ACCIPITE...
In a similar way, when supper was ended,
he took this precious chalice
in his holy and venerable hands,
and once more giving you thanks,
he said the blessing
and gave the chalice to his disciples, saying:
TAKE THIS...
In a similar way, when supper was ended,
he took this precious chalice
in his holy and venerable hands,
and once more giving you thanks,
he said the blessing
and gave the chalice to his disciples, saying:
TAKE THIS...
1973 and 1998 omit the Simili modo, which is present in one form or another in many Eucharistic Prayers, e.g. "Likewise" (Apostolic Tradition of Hippolytus), "In like manner also" (Apostolic Constitutions VIII), "After the same manner also" (Anaphora of St. Mark), "Likewise" (Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom). Two accounts of the Last Supper (Luke 22:20 and 1 Corinthians 11:25) also use the word Similiter. 1973 and 1998 omit the repetition of the phrase in sanctas ... manus suas, although many studies of Eucharistic prayers in general will stress that one of the tendencies in constructing the institution narrative in these ancient prayers was to make the section for the bread and the section for the wine parallel with one another; the Roman Canon did that with its repetition of this phrase. Finally, the phrase hunc praeclarum calicem is reduced simply to "the cup".
The 2011 translation addresses all the above issues. Regarding hunc praeclarum calicem, much can be said. First, the word hunc means "this"; it is specific: it means not just a chalice or the chalice, but this chalice. This does not literally identify the vessel being used by the priest with that used by Christ at the Last Supper, but it does so spiritually and sacramentally: it brings the institution narrative out of the realm of mere historical narration and into the realm of Christ acting through the priest in the Mass today. It is also a reference to the Vulgate text of Psalm 23(22):5, calix meus ... praeclarus est. This is the "goodly" (as the Douay-Rheims renders praeclarum) overflowing cup (or chalice) which the anointed one drinks from at the table prepared for in the presence of his enemies. The word praeclarum could have been translated in the Canon in ways other than "precious": "splendid", "noble", etc.
Father,
we celebrate the memory
of Christ, your Son.
We, your people and your ministers,
recall his passion,
his resurrection from the dead,
and his ascension into glory;
and from the many gifts you have given us
we offer to you, God of glory and majesty,
this holy
and perfect sacrifice:
the bread of life
and the cup of eternal salvation.
And so, Lord God,
we celebrate the memory
of Christ, your Son:
we, your holy people and your ministers,
call to mind his passion,
his resurrection from the dead,
and his ascension into glory;
and from the many gifts you have given us
we offer to you, God of glory and majesty,
this holy
and perfect sacrifice,
the bread of life
and the cup of eternal salvation.
Unde et memores,
Domine,
nos servi tui, sed et plebs tua sancta,
eiusdem Christi, Filii tui, Domini nostri,
tam beatae passionis,
necnon et ab inferis resurrectionis,
sed et in caelos gloriosae ascensionis:
offerimus praeclarae maiestati tuae
de tuis donis ac datis
hostiam puram, hostiam sanctam,
hostiam immaculatam
,
Panem sanctum vitae aeternae
et Calicem salutis perpetuae.
Therefore, O Lord,
as we celebrate the memorial
of the blessed Passion,
the Resurrection from the dead,
and the glorious Ascension into heaven
of Christ, your Son, our Lord,
we, your servants and your holy people,
offer to your glorious majesty
from the gifts that you have given us,
this pure victim, this holy victim,
this spotless victim,
the holy Bread of eternal life
and the Chalice of everlasting salvation.
Therefore, O Lord,
as we celebrate the memorial
of the blessed Passion,
the Resurrection from the dead,
and the glorious Ascension into heaven
of Christ, your Son, our Lord,
we, your servants and your holy people,
offer to your glorious majesty
from the gifts that you have given us,
this pure victim, this holy victim,
this spotless victim,
the holy Bread of eternal life
and the Chalice of everlasting salvation.
1973 has a tendency to translate Domine, Deus, and Pater interchangeably. 1998 resolves that for the most part, although it adds "God" to "Lord" (Domine) here. Neither completely translates Christi, Filii tui, Domini nostri. While 1998 restores sancta in plebs ... sancta, both it and 1973 invert the order of servi ... et plebs ("your (holy) people and your ministers"). Both omit the adjectives attached to the Passion and Ascension. Both reduce the triplet puram .. sanctam .. immaculatam to a doublet, and omit the sanctum adjective on panem.
2011 addresses all of the omissions and abbreviations listed above.
The Latin de tuis donis ac datis (literally "from your gifts and offerings") is idiomatically rendered as "from the [many] gifts you have given us" in all three translations, which is in line with the Greek expression found, for example, in the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, "ta sa ek ton son" (your own from your own).
Look with favor
on these offerings
and accept them
as once you accepted
the gifts of your servant Abel,
the sacrifice of Abraham, our father in faith,
and the bread and wine
offered
by your priest Melchizedek.
Look with favor
on these offerings
and accept them
as once you accepted
the gifts of your just servant Abel,
the sacrifice of Abraham, our father in faith,
and the bread and wine
offered
by your priest Melchizedek.
Supra quae propitio ac sereno vultu
respicere digneris:
et accepta habere,
sicuti accepta habere dignatus
es munera pueri tui iusti Abel,
et sacrificium Patriarchae nostri Abrahae,
et quod tibi obtulit
summus sacerdos tuus Melchisedech,
sanctum sacrificium, immaculatam hostiam.
Be pleased to look upon them
with serene and kindly countenance,
and to accept them,
as you were pleased to accept
the gifts of your servant Abel the just,
the sacrifice of Abraham, our father in faith,
and the offering
of your high priest Melchizedek,
a holy sacrifice, a spotless victim.
Be pleased to look upon these offerings
with a serene and kindly countenance,
and to accept them,
as once you were pleased to accept
the gifts of your servant Abel the just,
the sacrifice of Abraham, our father in faith,
and the offering
of your high priest Melchizedek,
a holy sacrifice, a spotless victim.
1973 omits the adjective "just" for Abel; 1998 and 2011 restore it. This description of Abel comes from Jesus Himself. (Matthew 23:35) Both 1973 and 1998 omit the (curious) title of "high priest" for Melchizedek, and call him simply a "priest". In Genesis 14:18 he is described as "priest of God Most High", but in the anaphora found in the Apostolic Constitutions, as well as the Roman Canon, he is called a "high priest". (It is presumed that must be a corruption of an original Greek text which called him "priest of the Most High".) The Leonine addition to this prayer (sanctum sacrificium, immaculatam hostiam) is replaced by "bread and wine".
2011 accurately renders Melchizedek's title and St. Leo's description of the offering.
Almighty God, we pray
that your angel
may take this sacrifice
to your altar in heaven.

Then,
as we receive from this altar
the sacred body and blood
of your Son,
let us be filled with every grace
and blessing.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Almighty God,
command that your angel
carry this sacrifice
to your altar in heaven.

Then,
as we receive from this altar
the sacred body and blood
of your Son,
let us be filled with every grace
and blessing.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Supplices te rogamus, omnipotens Deus:
iube haec perferri
per manus sancti Angeli tui
in sublime altare tuum,
in conspectu divinae maiestatis tuae;
ut,
quotquot ex hac altaris participatione
sacrosanctum Filii tui
Corpus et Sanguinem sumpserimus,
omni benedictione caelesti et gratia
repleamur.
[ Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen. ]
In humble prayer we ask you, almighty God:
command that these gifts be borne
by the hands of your holy Angel
to your altar on high
in the sight of your divine majesty,
so that all of us
who through this participation at the altar
receive the most holy Body and Blood
of your Son
may be filled with every grace
and heavenly blessing.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
In humble prayer we ask you, almighty God:
command that these gifts be borne
by the hands of your holy Angel
to your altar on high
in the sight of your divine majesty,
so that all of us,
who through this participation at the altar
receive the most holy Body and Blood
of your Son,
may be filled with every grace
and heavenly blessing.
(Through Christ our Lord. Amen.)
1973 and 1998 omit the phrase in conspectu divinae maiestatis tuae and the adjective caelesti on benedictione. More significantly, they both mistranslate ex hac altaris participatione as "receive from this altar".
2011 properly renders this latter phrase as "this participation at the altar". This is an important phrase because, unlike the earlier renderings, it is not juxtaposing the altar in heaven (sublime altare) with the altar on earth; instead, it says our reception of the Communion is participation in the gifts which have been raised up to the altar in heaven.
Remember, Lord,
those who have died and have gone before us
marked with the sign of faith,
especially those for whom we now pray, NN.
May these,
and all who sleep in Christ,
find in your presence light,
happiness, and peace
.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Remember, Lord, your servants
who have died and have gone before us
marked with the sign of faith,
especially those for whom we now pray NN.
Grant them
and all who sleep in Christ
a haven of light
and peace
.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Memento etiam, Domine,
famulorum famularumque tuarum N. et N.,
qui nos praecesserunt cum signo fidei,
et dormiunt in somno pacis.
Ipsis, Domine,
et omnibus in Christo quiescentibus,
locum refrigerii, lucis et pacis,
ut indulgeas, deprecamur.
[ Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen. ]
Remember also, Lord,
your servants N. and N.,
who have gone before us with the sign of faith
and rest in the sleep of peace.
Grant them, O Lord, we pray,
and all who sleep in Christ,
a place of refreshment,
light and peace.
[Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]
Remember also, Lord,
your servants N. and N.,
who have gone before us with the sign of faith
and rest in the sleep of peace.
Grant them, O Lord, we pray,
and all who sleep in Christ,
a place of refreshment,
light and peace.
(Through Christ our Lord. Amen.)
1973 avoided the "servants" language again, but 1998 and 2011 restored it; both 1973 and 1998 omit the expression dormiunt in somno pacis. Both omit the second invocation of the Lord. While 1973 renders all three words of refrigerii, lucis et pacis (the first as "happiness"), 1998 connects refrigerii more directly with locum and renders both together as "haven".
2011 addresses all these matters, and translates refrigerii as "refreshment".
For ourselves, too,
we ask some share
in the fellowship of your apostles and martyrs,
with John the Baptist, [...]
and all the saints.
Though we are sinners,
we trust in your mercy and love.

Do not consider what we truly deserve,
but grant us your forgiveness.
Through Christ our Lord.
For ourselves, too,
sinners
who trust in your mercy and love,
we ask some share
in the fellowship of your apostles and martyrs,
with John the Baptist, [...]
and all your saints.
Welcome us into their company,
not considering what we deserve,
but freely granting us your pardon.
Through Christ our Lord
Nobis quoque peccatoribus famulis tuis,
de multitudine miserationum tuarum
sperantibus,
partem aliquam et societatem donare digneris
cum tuis sanctis Apostolis et Martyribus:
cum Ioanne, [...]
et omnibus Sanctis tuis:
intra quorum nos consortium,
non aestimator meriti, sed veniae,
quaesumus, largitor admitte.
Per Christum Dominum nostrum.
To us, also, your
sinful servants, who
hope in your abundant mercies,
graciously grant some share and fellowship
with your holy Apostles and Martyrs:
with John the Baptist, [...]
and all your Saints:
admit us, we beg you, into their company,
not weighing our merits,
but granting us your pardon,
through Christ our Lord.
To us, also, your
servants, who, though sinners,
hope in your abundant mercies,
graciously grant some share and fellowship
with your holy Apostles and Martyrs:
with John the Baptist, [...]
and all your Saints;
admit us, we beseech you, into their company,
not weighing our merits,
but granting us your pardon,
through Christ our Lord.
1973 deferred the mention of "we ... sinners" which occurs at the beginning of this prayer in Latin. 1998 and 2011 mention it as close to the beginning as practical. The phrase intra quorum nos consortium which is omitted in 1973 is restored in 1998 and 2011. The Latin partem ... et societatem does not mean "share in the fellowship" (as in 1973 and 1998) but "share and fellowship" (as in 2011). Our "fellowship" with the saints is not the total of the "share" we ask for here.
Through him you give us
all these gifts.
You fill them with life and goodness,
you bless them and make them holy.
you give us
all these gifts,
you fill them with life and goodness,
you bless them and make them holy.
Per quem haec omnia, Domine,
semper bona creas,
sanctificas, vivificas,
benedicis, et praestas nobis.
Through whom you continue to create
all these good things, O Lord;
you make them holy, fill them with life,
bless them, and bestow them upon us.
Through whom you continue to make
all these good things, O Lord;
you sanctify them, fill them with life,
bless them, and bestow them upon us.
2011 restores the order of the verbs in the Latin, so that the bestowing of the gifts is the climax of this prayer. Some older commentaries see a link between these verbs and the process undergone by the bread and wine consecrated at Mass (they are created, sanctified at the Offertory or the pre-consecration Epiclesis, filled with life at the Consecration, blessed at the post-consecration Epiclesis, and bestowed upon us at Communion) although this prayer was originally intended to refer to other gifts present on or near the altar for blessing.